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the most expensive election of all time. >> we're here on the campus of ucla law school where they debate constitutional issues. today they're doing a convention on money out and voters in. >> and we have our elbow of the day later. jr jackson is going to love this. tweet us at tyt on current if you can guess who it is. zisko>>>el granada is a special place to learn because we have a dedicated community and a dedicated staff. and when kids come on campus everyday, they're enthusiasm for learning shines. we receive federal funding because a majority of our students are socially disadvantaged. making sure our students receive healthy nutritious lunches and breakfasts is critical to their learning. i would like to see students take more ownership of what they eat everyday and learn about their bodies and how their food nourishes them. sandra jonaidi>>> i hope that we get them early enough that they've learn some good eating habits and they go forward and become very productive humans and grow up to make us all proud of them. narrator>> for more info, go to curren
of ucla law school where they argue constitution. today they're discussing money out, voters in. >> and jayar jackson will love this. tweet us on @tytoncurrent if you can guess who it is. before the cold & flu season help prevent with lysol. because when you have 10 times more protection with each hand wash... and kill 99.9% of germs around the house with each spray... those healthy habits start to add up. this season, a good offense is the best defense and lysol has your family covered because that's our mission for health. >> it's no secret to regular viewers of this show that cenk has long been passionate, unbelievably passionate about campaign finance reform. this past weekend at ucla law school, he was invited to participate in a conference called money out voters in. let's take a look at how that worked out. >> cenk: we're here on the campus of ucla law school. where they debate constitutional issues. today they're doing a convention on money out voters in. the issue of getting money out of politics. they'll be discussing the pr
? >> it would be much larger constituency about creating that device. >> beyond that, law enforcement has other techniques. they do not need a special device. there is still reckless driving on the books, the power of the nation -- of observation and other evidence that can be relied upon. the same outcome to restrict -- >> can odor be introduced as evidence? rex the officers perception of an odor can. some potential evidence. >> talking about regulating the illegal drugs, they mentioned that 80% of the position painkillers in the world are sold in the united states. five percent of the population of the world's 80% of the world's painkillers. drug related overdoses for death -- close to 70% were from prescription drugs. even the drugs that we regulate -- we do not seem to be doing too good of a drug -- of a job at a lot of people are dying to reque. >> we would not have any car fatalities if there were no cars. i do not need to make light of what you're saying but the fact that failure of the peace and not condemn the value that exists for these other off -- these other. this brings up a large
the detention of united states citizens or lawful resident aliens of the united states or any other persons who are captured or arrested in the united states." now, that was just sort of to say, leave things as they are right now. it preserved the current state of the law, continuing to leave it to the courts to resolve who is right about whether or not the aoumf authorizes the military detention of united states citizens who are apprehended domestically. i believe strongly that the time has come now to end this legal ambiguity and to state clearly once and for all that the aumf or other authorities do not authorize such a definite detention of americans apprehended in the united states. this is without charge or without trial for year after year after year. to accomplish this, we are offering an amendment which affirms the continuing application of the principles behind the nondetention act of 1971. it amends that act to provide clearly in a clear statement that no military authorization allows indefinite detention of united states citizens or green card holders who are apprehended
because i went to law school, i went to stanford specifically to study the first amendment. it's been a passion of mine my entire life. i believe it is in part i had a russian father and a british mother and i came from that background realizing that the rule had to be that everybody got to say what they wanted to under the circumstances. the idea that, like, the government could understand what you said so it would be my mom or my dad in charge. in the general society free-speech said be the rule coming and i've always believed that. and so the history of the first amendment law we every class stanford offered indicted six additional credits of my own design on the history of the freedom of speech and despite all of that, i was utterly unprepared for the kind of cases i would see on the college campuses. utterly unprepared. and to dhaka little bit about this this is one of the reasons i wrote the book because it feels like banging my head against bill wall i'd been writing articles about this for my entire career, and i started getting people coming back to me saying well, okay, sure
for an hour with students about the supreme court and constitutional law. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you, and thank you, david, for that gracious introduction, and all of you for a very, very warm welcome. this is my first visit to rice, and i'm already glad that i came. president lee told you i can't talk about anything current, future, or past. [laughter] my remarks will be brief. [laughter] i had the pleasure of knowing david for 35 years. as he mentioned, he was the president back then too of the harvard law review. he's used to holding the reigns of power. a chief justice also holds the reigns of power. the only difference is that a chief justice has to hold them lightly, less he discover they are not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps a faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to light a special vision, talent, and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to vis
. it's all haphazard and disorganized, but because of the lack of rule of law, the definition of who owns what in because they don't have addresses, can't get the credit. john: don't have addresses. >> well, to get an address somebody has to recognize the that is where you live. legal recognition. legal recognition means property when you have property, mailing address is command when you make a deal was someone you can be identified. the first -- the second characteristic in the is the address. if you go anywhere they say what is in a minority live. and some property is defined by law they cannot get into the kind of deals or the division of labor which is cooperation, specializing and create wealth because that is what makes you will the, the fact you don't have to milk a cow every day. you don't have to us borderland every day, build your own house. you can stick to doing a tv program. this part of a blackberry. the all market put together. the whole building, take care of it, and they can specialize. the day that they get titles, the day that the businesses in their homes, the se
to this one particular law passed in the 1980s. and how does that account for rising income inequality in canada? or even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? it is happening all over the world and the emerging market. it is important to face that squarely because if you see it just as a political phenomenon you are going to lose sight of what i think is a big challenge which is that these actually quite benign economic forces, and i love the technology revolution. are also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, how he sees it is the big drivers are probably the economic forces but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics, instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces, has exacerbated them. even if you have economic forces creating more concentration at the very top you expect politics to try to soften the blow, financial institutions to soften the blow and instead it is accelerating and to me that is about right. who are the sup
. >> where can we go? we are being killed. we ask the world to help for our children. we must prevail. is law must prevail. -- is lamed he must prevail. >> many have families in the tents. >> we have been here for seven months. it is the safest place we can find. but even here we are afraid we will be shelled. >> turkey is reluctant to take more refugees, so a little it has got to go further. people cling to what little dignity they can, that they are despairing that anyone will bring this to an end. >> the misery of life for syria because the refugees as winter comes on, the conditions in camp will only get worse. less than a week after the end of fighting between cost and israel, egyptian mediators have started talks with both sides to work on details of the ceasefire. with discussions underway, a hamas has been for the first time allowed to control the border area between israel and gaza to control the violence. our correspondent is there. >> there is a high chance we would have been killed if we had tried to come here just a couple of weeks back. but the cease-fire means israel has lifted
said that we should return to the clinton era tax law. just think of that era we had. we had a budget surpluses. and we had a winning prosperity. i do not think we need to fear returning to the clinton tax law. and as the caller said from texas, the democrats have demonized the bush tax cuts. and so we will see with the demon is. the 47% who do not pay income tax from about 30% of them will return to the tax rolls. and at least the pain is like to be spread around here to everybody. and i find the connection of the grover norquist problem is that if we returned to the clinton tax law, then everybody next year will just want to reduce taxes and the republicans will be free to vote for those things without the pledge interfering with that. i think what would solve that issue as well. so i think we would all be a lot better off. more dollars over 10 years. and it would come from every american. we have a huge problem here. and by the president's position of and not willing to dip below $250,000, is just as impractical as grover norquist's no tax pledge. i find the president's position ju
become self-reinforcing, so you have more political inequality that generates laws and regulations that lead to more economic inequality, and that goes back into political inequality. the example i find astounding are something like our bankruptcy laws. something very technical. nobody normally gets interested in. one provision of the bankruptcy law is that when you go bankrupt, the question is, who gets paid first? that a big issue. the answer is, the derivatives. not a surprise. because they put it in when everybody else was not noticing who pays attention to bankruptcy laws? what does that mean? that means you encourage that kind of economic activity. but at the other extreme, student loans can't be discharged even in bankruptcy. so, that means that the banks do well, but it really discourages people borrowing for student loans, and in a country where we have tuition going up, in the last three years, average state university tuition has gone up 40%, because of the cutbacks in state budgets. incomes are going down, the only way that people can afford it is borrowing, and then th
. there may be a federal labor law wish the national labor relations board. >> eric: how convenient that the three democrats and one republican all obama appointe appointees won't rule on this until tomorrow. and by then it will be too late. they will still have the protest going on outside of wal-mart. >> dana: they didn't wait when they prevented boeing going to south carolina. >> bob: wal-mart is bullied by the employees. they don't have the unions. >> eric: this is moveon.org who started this that sent out the e-mails to various supporters of their cause. so "a" , protest, "b," talk to management, "c," dash >> bob: call this what it this is. the largest company in the united states ripping off the employees. >> eric: how ripping them nauf >> bob: not paying them living wage. >> eric: what is the living wage? >> bob: more than $12. >> eric: what is the living wage? >> dana: always a little more. that's how they survive. i'm not saying, maybe they deserve to get paid more. maybe they will be successful and have an impact on them. if they are not -- if they are successful does anyo
these people have how much they depend on the rule of law with public purse structure and public treasury saving them. said to talk about the psyche of their fortunes based on political stability. >> of course, it varies but i was surprised there was also ayn rand and john paul fantasy. i was surprised that that was current. is it actual effort to build the gold goal to. the paypal guy is one of the founders it is more beautiful and you could make it up from milton friedman grandson. they're trying to the -- bill the island's in international waters where no laws apply. you could go and create your kind of world. there were some people and a do quote them in my book when a bomb gave his speech last fall the fdr commonwealth club speech, immediately there were investor notes that a plan that was discovered and all of the rich people should with there. more than you would take a very ayn rand type of sense you got this with foster friess, meant he gives them so much we are the job creators. also zero gary gensler was speaking with great passion and pleasure had there been the transparency t
enforcement, along with the u.s. customs and border protection, as well as federal and local and foreign law enforcement has created this initiative. the first best initiative was created in laredo back in 2005. and it's become a model across the country. and this is a comprehensive approach to identify, disrupt, dismantle transnational criminal organizations that have posed significant threats to the border and maritime security. through investigations, seize years of contra-- seizures of contraband, they are building success. there are 48 units throughout the united states. they work not only with the mexican counterparts but with the canadian counterparts. certainly we want to make sure that congress provides the best support to the best units in order to enhance border security and of course the communities that we have -- that we all represent. so, again, members, i would ask that you all work and support this bill and today, a very appropriate time, we had the new president-elect of mexico that came down here, met with members of congress and i believe at this particular time he's meet
and who are attractive and that is really where his eyes had been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. now on booktv, nicole eustace examines the effects the war of 1812 had on american politics and patriotism. the author reports at the end of the three year war resulted in the quote era of good feelings marked by defuse partisanship and greater nationalism. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and thank you to the david library for hosting me. to real it's a real pleasure to be here and to see all of you this afternoon. thank you. the title of my talk this afternoon is love and honor in 1812, patriotism and popular culture in the new united states. on june 19 of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said quote, i extort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as the feel wrong that they exert themselves. madisons call made clear th
. that's all. that is our understanding. discussing based on multi international law. >> right. i know the united states recognizes -- who think post these islands? hoodie think has control of the islands? >> whoever has the better navy. [laughter] >> got it. this gentleman right here. yes. >> is this on? henry roth from canada. we heard technology is often the . the forgotten factor. only the numbers show about 50 million chinese men and women are involved in scientific research. like everything else, it has a jekyll and hyde personality. let's leave that aside for a moment with cyber issues and other issues that are important. some could argue that rather large segment of the chinese population is probably one of the most globally connected an open parts. looking at a way of engaging china and sing china's place in the world on this important aspect of economic development and political development, county see this playing out? i know both india and japan have engaged. >> responses to the dr. jekyll? >> sun's technology, at math, funnel to the growth of the economy's. the u.s. has wo
, there was a program that got me through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our sleeves and came up with a bipartisan solution that ultimately bought over 50 years of solvency for social security. we raised the retirement age, payable taxes on social security, and we taxed those social security benefits indirectly for the first time. today, social security will make every promised payment for the next 22 years. you cannot say that about much in washington. social security has not added one penny to the deficit. for those who say there is good reason to push it off the table and wait, i would add
, which are banned under international humanitarian law, it is a very dire situation. this is a huge problem that it is going to new lows, these banned weapons are being used and civilians and children are being killed. >> one of our international -- senior international correspondents, arwa damon, filed a report from the syrian border with turkey, she shows this refugee camp on the border, that is being actually targeted, the camp is being targeted by air strikes. turkish officials wouldn't let our reporter into the camp. it is not at all safe for her to do that. she actually spoke on the phone with a teacher, let's listen and we'll talk on the other side. >> the turkish military asked us to move from our other location but the teach wears telling us that she's been living in the camp for four months. he said there are around 12,000 people who were there. he was in the process of giving one of his classes when the first strike took place. he said it was complete and total chaos, the children were screaming, yelling, the entire camp began trying to run for the borders for safety. >>
could not overturn any law he has issued since taking power in june. opposition protesters have called for a sit-in in tahir jair while the muslim brotherhood said they will stage nationwide demonstrations in support of morsi's plans. >>> as the truce holds between hamas and israel for if fourth day, president mahmoud abbas is confident. palestinian factions are supporting the effort but the others are opposing it. >>> finally lotto fever. lottery officials say there were no winners in last night's power lottery pushing this week's jackpot to under $425 million. that's the largest jackpot ever for the game. those are your top stories. now back to "fareed zakaria gps." >>> we live in a borderless world, right, where globalization, inper dependence, and economics are reshaping the way companies and countries cooperate. not quite, says robert kaplan. he's written a book called "the revenge of geography: what the map tells us about coming conflicts and the battle of flight." >> he joins me now. you have this terrific book out. explain what the premise is. mine i tried to very briefly do it
you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>> now for our "what in the world" segment. with president obama's visit to asia and war in gaza, they have been focused on the far east and middle east. let's not forget the surprising developments in the region we share a 2,000-mile border with, latin america. i just read a new world bank report -- yeah, that is what i do in my spare time -- and it has some important findings. between the years 2003 and 2009, nearly 50 million people joined latin america's middle class. that's twice the entire population of the state of texas and the sixth of america's population as a whole. in those six years, the size of the region's middle class expanded by 50%. the proportion of people in poverty fell sharply from 44% to 30%. and as the rest of the world became more unequal, latin america was the only region to decrease the gap between rich and poor. the findings have important consequences locally, but also for the world. when china lifted hundreds of milli
the nausea? >> nothing works as well. oregon law approved requires no monitoring of a child's medical monitor use by a pediatrician. >> that's dumb. >> god forbid any of my children were sick and there could be anything that could alleviate their pain or discomfort, i would do it. no blink of an eye. >> and then you have the problem that these parents are divorced, and if one parent in that -- that parental family, if you will, decides that they don't want their child to take certain medication, then that brings in another legal rub which is what you have. >> and the dad in this case said i'm worried about what it will do to my child's brain and that's a very responsible way. >> when he saw his little girl she was stoned. >> when you're on morphine you're stoned. we're probably not competent, the three of us have never tried pot, so we're probably not -- >> not even touching that one with a ten foot pole. >> i definitely can't. go ahead. >> next topic, denied boarding death of a woman. a woman visiting overseas from hungary. tried to get back on three different flights, 425 pound, obese. had
of the material and how it's currently managed. but that's done according to law. >> the industry opposes calling coal ash hazardous waste. they're pushing for another solution: recycling. [ticking] >> as we'll see when 60 minutes on cnbc returns, the coal industry thinks it's found a solution by recycling coal ash. but in some cases, it's only made the problem worse. x- "sounn drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing. it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. i put away money. i was 21, so i said, "hmm, i want to retire at 55." and before you know it, i'm 58 years old. time went by very fast. it goes by too, too fast. ♪ but i would do it again in a heartbeat. [ laughs ] ♪
could find astounding is the bankruptcy-law. nobody normally is interested. who gets paid first? of the derivatives. they put it in when nobody else was notice same. who pays attention to bankruptcy laws? so you encourage economic activity. student loans cannot be discharged. even in bankruptcy. the banks do well sell it has tuition going up the tests of the cutback of the state budget. and come is going down but the only way people can afford it is the borough then they get she did as a lot of them have been particularly with the for-profit private schools. the results is if you don't get a job with the recession it is a news around your neck. >> host: teachers. what ehud telling people looking at those tuition bills and unemployment? >> >> this is so rare is the 1% to the extent they're not coming from the 1% by getting generous scholarships. >> i certainly have relatives who are urging them to not be dependent and then nephew thank god teaching english and we're urging him to stay there until the job market is better but we move off the question of the current depressing econ
't open. many are home to large financial and law firms and could be closed for months because of electrical damage. >>> and officials now say human error caused this massive gas explosion in springfield, massachusetts, friday. a utility worker accidentally punctured a pipeline while looking for a leak. 18 people were hurt. most of them gas workers. >>> finally, it appeared to be another afternoon of football yesterday. dolphins and seahawks took the field in miami. and something happened. something i have never seen before. the sprinklers coming on in the middle of the game. you will notice, sunny 70s. so really -- nobody cared. after all, it was miami, sunny and 70s. a brief delay in the game. a computer glitch actually caused them to follow a saturday schedule, a local schedule. it was really an express sunday. thankfully, the home folks did win. everybody went home wet and happy. >> except for the grounds people. thanks, josh. >>> we're going to turn now to president obama back from his post election trip to asia and a thanksgiving break. rearranging his cabinet a top prior
until he comes back to be a law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> imacs, author and lecturer, kenneth davis, cleaned author of the don't know much about serious talks about history, geography and more. the selling off there has written 12 adult nonfiction books including the hidden history, and nation rising and is 2012 release, "don't know >> host: author kennetn presidents." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did they don't know much series of books come from?t th where did that idea come from? >> guest: the idea came fromtleg my own little brain, although it didn't start out as theh series. it started out with the idea that i loved american history, wanted to write about it. i wanted to write about in a way that shared my enthusiasm for a subject i've loved since i was a small child. the title came of course you and sam song, which i knew from childhood and so it got stuck in my head. and certainly the success of the book, which caught me by surprise more than anyone else perhaps led to the beginning of the series. she outgrew followed and on and on it went from there. s
of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel, yet we only health -- have 100,000 of our people living there. is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty. you mentioned a search and rescue. at this time of year, but there are 24 hours a day and temperatures plummet below 50 degrees celsius. you have open waters and changes that are born to create a lot of challenges because more people are simply going to go there and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others who want to be a part of this arctic council. to your question about the obligation to, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and res
money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends dember 7th. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >> 23s after the top of the hour. quick headlines. pakistan's military test fired a nuclear capable missile launch happened from an undisclosed location. it was able to build conventional and nuclear war heads 800 miles and that is not good. tax dollars at work. people in buffalo new york. spent 2.7 million so teachers could get plastec surgery. procedures provided under the great union contracts. gretch you and brian. >> gretchen: thank you very much, steve. we heard about the war on women in the presidential campaign. is there a war on men, too. the next cites that's the reason marriage stats are down. >> 50 percent adults were married in 2011 compared to 72 percent in 1960. we'll ask susan banker who is the author of this book. how to choose a husband and make peace with marriage. the rise of women in society ticked off men, is that correct. >> hi, guyings, how are you and thanks for having me on. it is a interestin
at the time was an interesting law. if the slave is in the state for more than six months, he was emancipated. washington had to move his slaves back and forth between mount vernon and philadelphia to keep them from being emancipated , even though this is absolutely against the letter of the pennsylvania state law. so that is the side of the story we often don't tell. a man of his time, absolutely. during the revolution when he takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author
, the trouble with american labor laws is that a small cad ray of pro union employees were able to sink an entire company where you've got tens of thousands or at least 10,000 employees who had absolutely no want or wish to see this happen. there's 7,500 teamsters willing to take these concessions and keep their job. look at it this way. there's no rational actor that would tell you a job on monday at slightly reduced wages is better than no job at all. >> what about that, mike? >> where does slightly reduced come in? what does that mean? no, it's 27% over five years. >> you could have looked for another job. if you didn't want the job, that's fine. there's other people that need money this holiday season. >> they were stealing my pension at the same time. >> but look what happened now. >> yeah, you're going to have nothing. >> mike, the assumption we're making is that when you get a job back, if you get your job back with wonder bread, it's a nonunion job and therefore you'll probably get fewer benefits. -- >> i don't know why uld make such a silly assumption that i would be a nonunion
. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>> 15,000 hostess works are out of a job on thanksgiving, a bankruptcy court judge has given the make of twinkies, wonder bread the okay to wind down business and sell off assets. 3200 employees will help find buyers, which includes drake cakes and dolly madison ice cream. hostess failed to reach a deal tuesday. >>> walmart is asking federal officials to stop union bank protests and walk-outs but any decision's not likely to come until tomorrow at the earliest. workers protesting for better pay and benefits and against opening up on thanksgiving tonight early for shopping. >>> no working on wall street today. marks closed for thanksgiving. santa helped ring the closing bell to mark the 65th anniversary of the marines toys for tots program. >>> ready, set, shop. the biggest shopping weekend of the year's about to kick off. estimated 147 million of us will take advantage of black friday weekend sales, 4% more than last year
on fox business that a class-action lawsuit has been filed against hewlett-packard, a law firm -- we're looking at this issue with autonomy, it's a company they had to write down the acquisition by billions and billions of dollars. so clearly this is the breaking news on hewlett-packard right now. not really moving that much. still up about 28 cents. apple as you saw up sharply. analysts talking about a strong black friday for apple based on some checks on their stores. analysts run in there and look at the stores and watch and see what people are buying. apple is what people are buying. we're stuck in the pool of red with bits of green. let's find out why and whether we hoist ourselves out of it. let's go to our floor show. ben willis, can we switch this tomorrow or is it a headline driven market? >> this is a natural pullback from overbought overextended rally we saw last week. natural pullback. nothing to panic about if you are a long-term investor, you should have your shopping list ready to buy them as they come back in. i would like to see a little bit more work to the down sid
surrounding the passage of the budget control act. the law created automatic spending cuts set to take effect in january along with expiring tax provisions, part of the so- called fiscal cliff. that is tonight at 8:00 eastern on c-span. congress returns from a week long thanksgiving break this week. the house is back tomorrow to debate a number of bills. a major bill comes up on thursday when they will consider a visa program for students getting advanced degrees and computer science, engineering and mathematics. off the floor, democrats plan to let new leadership. that is scheduled for thursday. you can see the house tomorrow on c-span. the senate is back today at 2:00 eastern. they will finish work on what is called the sportsman bill, expanding hunting and fishing on federal lands. that begins at 5:30 eastern. you can see the senate live on our companion network, sees that2 -- c-span2. >> you listen to mayor bloomberg who says the damage was unprecedented. the previous high was 10 feet. for this high, the tidal surge was 14 feet. gov. chris christie said that the damage was unthinkable. at
exchanges such as what occurred with greece if this is the case and there can be case law said that you have to pay interest to those who didn't exchange, it may make those kind of exchanges far more difficult. >> i listened to your breaking story on friday. i said i don't understand the jurisdiction. how does a federal court tell argentina what to do? >> i think it also comes back to the payment bank of new york as the third party transferrer of funds from argentinean government forcing them to -- it's a good question. i can't say that i can absolutely answer it definitively for you. >> could the federal court order the deposition of the head of iraq? let's get him in here. let's depose him. >> there's some standing questions there. no question about that. >> i just find that argentina may be -- argentina is doing a lot of things behind the scenes with tariffs and very tough on american business people. are they going to say a federal court judge, they're going to hold us in contempt? what does he got? how many divisions does the federal court judge have? >> they can force the payment and i
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